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Fundación Cordillera Tropical

27 Case Pkwy

Burlington, VT 05401

802-855-7612

info@cordilleratropical.org

Fundacion Cordillera Tropical is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charitable organization (EIN: 83-4182371) under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax-deductible as allowed by law.

© 2019   Fundacion Cordillera Tropical  

PROTECT THE ANDEAN AMAZON  

               AND HELP SAFEGUARD THE PLANET

MODEL THE AMAZON HEADWATERS

Rivers tell the story of their watersheds.  The science of hydrology translates that story for us into the words and numbers that speak to environmental decision-makers.  FCT works to facilitate this process.

RESTORE ANDEAN MONTANE FORESTS

"When crops and pastures replace native forest or paramo, the original wild habitat is not only reduced in size, it becomes fragmented."

"If you hike the wild landscapes of the Andes, and you're quiet and a bit lucky, you might encounter an Andean bear.  You will be astounded by their grandeur.  And saddened to know that their numbers, not exceeding 3,000 individuals in Ecuador, are declining across thier range."

DEFEND THREATENED WILDLIFE

EMPOWER LOCAL COMMUNITIES

Community-based conservation is indigenous empowerment. This applies to ‘indigenous’ in the strict sense of communities with native American culture and identities, but in a broader sense to rural communities rooted, usually for generations, in the areas where the survival of wild habitats is at stake.

ANDEAN AMAZON RESEARCH INSTITUTE (AARI)

Good decisions require accurate and timely information in the service of a clearly-defined outcome.  

For conservation efforts to be effective, and the best possible preparations made for climate change, decision-makers and the public require the fruits of research. FCT supports this need with its Andean Amazon Research Institute (AARI).

"When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world."

                                    

John Muir, naturalist, 1838-1914